<< Back to main

NHCS Newsletter: Spring/Summer Session, WEEK 5, NO Oysters,White Hake

Posted 5/29/2017 3:24pm by Andrea Tomlinson.

NH Community Seafood-Community Supported Fishery (CSF)

Eat Fresher Fish.  Support Our Fishing Community.

Dear %%user-name%%,

It is Week 5 and we were originally going to serve up Oysters this week, but due to inclement weather, we are serving up White Hake. Oysters will be served up next week, Week 6 and Week 8.

We know this is confusing and apologize! We are trying to take the confusion out of it with multiple email notifications and easy instructions! The rain is preventing our oyster farmers from being able to harvest our oysters this week!!

If you do not want oysters, please do a HOLD here for those weeks, they are listed as "Week starting June 6" (WEEK 6) or "Week starting June 20" on the HOLD list. You will receive a credit for the oysters at $16/share to use for Additional Fish (see below, now available!!)or Add ons within the session.

Did you not want oysters this week and did a HOLD, but would like Fish instead? Just respond to this email with the word "FISH" and we will remove your HOLD for this week for you, move it to next week, credit you, and get you your fish this week!

This week's Catch of the Week is White Hake, a local, delectable treat from our NH waters!

Distinguished by the white barbels on the chin and white spots, White Hake are found from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to Cape Hatteras, NC and occasionally some schools will stray into deep waters off the coast of Florida. White hake migrate from cooler, deeper waters in the winter to warmer, shallower waters in the spring and summer. Some juveniles can be found in estuaries in the summer. Adult hake can live up to 20 years old and female white hake are among the most fertile of all groundfish (the fish that live on the bottom or "ground" of the ocean), producing up to several million eggs in one spawn!

 

Despite it's name, the hake is not all white, it is a mud-colored (hence the nickname, "Mud Hake"), white spotted fish on the sides, bronze-gold colored on top and white on the underbelly. Hake have a rather large mouth, the cardinal barbel and very long pectoral (the ones on the sides) fins that have ray- like projections spanning off the body.

 

White hake are delicious because they primarily eat small crustaceans like lobsters and crabs and shrimp! What a bonus for us! Their flesh has a thick, white meaty consistency and cooks up nicely. Here is a link to some great recipes on Pinterest,https://www.pinterest.com/explore/hake-recipes/

 

 

Hake with Crisp Sweet Garlic and Olive Oil (Courtesy of Pinterest)

 

Our Fisherman this week  is NH Sector fisherman, Fanel Dobre, owner of  the F/V Angela Michelle.  

 

F/V Angela Michelle tied up at the Portland, Me docks

 
Additional Fish Orders- Use your Credit from HOLDING SHELLFISH: 
 
Starting this week, you can order Additional Fish each week HERE if you would like! This is one way to get extra fish if you did a HOLD on a Shellfish week. We credit you the week of the Shellfish Week that you held. As of tomorrow, if you are holding for the first oyster week, you will receive a credit on your account ($16/oysters and $14/lobsters). We will extend the deadline for Additional Fish to tomorrow night for you to do this!
 
You can use this credit to buy Additional fish by the pound throughout your session here. Or, if you don't have a credit, just use your credit or debit card to order extra fish any week you need it!
 

We sincerely apologize for the change of schedule this week, we are a weather dependent business!

Thanks for your support!

Cheers,

Andrea

General Manager

 

              

 

Mailing Address: 1 Peirce Island Rd, Portsmouth, NH 03801

nhcommunityseafood@gmail.com

www.nhcommunityseafood.com

 

 

Like Us On Facebook

Local Catch Logo

Proud Member of LocalCatch.org

LocalCatch.org is a community-of-practice made up of fisherman, organizers, researchers, and consumers from across North America that are committed to providing local, healthful, low-impact seafood via community supported fisheries and direct marketing arrangements in order to support healthy fisheries and the communities that depend on them.

 

Follow Us On Twitter